malformalady:

Yili Apricot Valley, China. Every year, these rolling hills in Xinjiang explode into a puffy sea of pink and white. As the largest groves of apricots in the region, this flowering signifies the beginning of the fruiting season, while also transforming the landscape into something other-worldly.
lecollecteur:

Egon Schiele, Schlafendes Paar [Sleeping Couple], 1909.
Pencil on paper, 32 x 30 cm.
metropolitanh:

Pedra da Gávea, @gpferrer - I’d do it all over again just to have my breath taken away by this view

The Mindy Project season two gag reel

nevver:

Marc Johns
beatpie:

Mara Caffarone
278
"A woman is only vulnerable when her nail polish is drying, and even then she can still pull a trigger."
some great quote I heard somewhere once upon a time and that is very, very true (via traffic-jam-session)
dailydoseofstuf:

Audrey Hepburn and Fred Astaire practicing for the film Funny Face.
309
"First we feel. Then we fall."
James Joyce, Finnegans Wake.  (via wordsnquotes)

Lowell Birge Harrison, Fifth Avenue at Twilight (c. 1910)
"Lowell Birge Harrison merged his Beaux-Arts academic training with American Transcendentalist sensibilities. He combined a technical finesse with a subjective feeling for the spiritual essence of landscape that made his art and teaching (his textbook on landscape painting was a bestseller in its day) central to the Tonalist movement. Harrison championed what he called “the big vision—the power to see and to render the whole of a given scene or picture motive, rather than to paint a still-life picture of its component parts; the power to give the essential and to suppress the inessential, the power to paint the atmosphere which surrounds the objects rather than the objects themselves….” Like James Abbott McNeill Whistler and George Inness, Harrison sought to express the power of place to move the observer." - Artsy
starklady:

probably my fav game of thrones cap ever